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Device lets gyms offer fitness tracking as a service

Gymtrack is a system that lets venues provide wearable trackers and virtual personal training for members each time they workout.

The wearable health-tracking market is bigger than ever and consumers can now even take advantage of apps such as FitStar, that lets them get personalized fitness training at home. However, not everyone can afford their own gadgets and the gym is still a popular meeting place for likeminded exercise enthusiasts. Gymtrack is a system that lets venues provide wearable trackers and virtual personal training for members each time they workout.

When gym members arrive at the venue, the Gymtrack wristband can be handed over and synced with the customer’s smartphone. The NFC-enabled wearable features sensors to track activity, much like other fitness wristbands, and also communicated with smart modules located on weights and other gym equipment. The system detects the type of exercise that’s being performed and notifies members of their performance at their last attempt through their headphones. The audio feedback also guides users through exercises and creates personalized workout plans based on their abilities.

Gymtrack offers its app as both an iOS or Android download and website to check up on their progress over time. While pricing isn’t public yet, according to the company there’s a per user, per week fee, plus an initial setup fee. Motion-tracking bracelets are sold to gyms for USD 50, and can be retailed by gyms to members for USD 100 for those who want to keep theirs. Gymtrack gives gyms a new service to offer to their customers while at the same time tapping the existing wearable health-tracking market. Can you think of any other services gyms can offer to improve the experience of working out?

Website: www.gymtrack.co
Contact: www.gymtrack.co/contact

In Brazil, soccer pitch floodlights are powered by players’ energy on the field

Shell’s Morro da Mineira Project has opened a soccer pitch in the favelas that captures the energy of players and uses it to sustainably power floodlights at nighttime.


Community sports facilities are vital to provide a space for communities to come together and keep fit, but they cost money to run and the resources aren’t always there to keep them in good shape. This is especially the case in Brazil, where the country’s disconnected communities where public spaces aren’t lit up at night, rendering them unusable. In Rio de Janeiro, soccer legend Pelé recently helped launch Shell’s Morro da Mineira Project has opened a soccer pitch in the favelas that captures the energy of players and uses it to sustainably power floodlights at nighttime.

Located in the Morro da Mineira favela, the pitch has long been a popular practice space for kids in the neighborhood. It’s now been renovated with tiles located underneath the surface that become charged when a force is placed upon them. Throughout the day, the energy of the players using the field is captured and stored as electricity, while solar panels also collect the sun’s energy. Previously, kids had to stop playing when night fell, but the new system is now used to power floodlights that make the space safe even when it’s dark. The community benefits from extended access to the resource, keeping kids healthy and out of trouble, while avoiding the high bills that typically come from non-renewable power.

We’ve already written about Cablean Sportveld, a sports pitch in the Netherlands that turns into a giant solar panel when not in use. Are there other ways to sustainably power community spaces?

Website: www.shell.com
Contact: www.shell.com/global/aboutshell/contact-us.html

Live yoga instruction streamed into the home

Finland’s Yoogaia is enabling anyone with a webcam to join in yoga classes and receive guidance from the comfort of their own living room.

Gym memberships are often prohibitively expensive, and those wanting some instruction can find themselves paying even more money. However, online video platforms are now making it easier — and cheaper — to connect with experts remotely. We’ve already written about Peloton, an exercise bike for the home that streams live spinning sessions. Now Finland’s Yoogaia is enabling anyone with a webcam to join in yoga classes and receive guidance from the comfort of their own living room.

Yoogaia offers a number of interactive classes led by expert instructors, ranging from yoga, pilates, core and kettle bell sessions. Members can pay EUR 10 a week or EUR 70 a year’s membership, which grants them access to as many live classes as they like. Users can browse the online schedule to see when live classes are taking place, and if they miss one they can watch the recording. When in a live session, members have the option of sharing their webcam with the instructor, who can then offer real-time feedback. Available in Finland, Hong Kong, the US and UK, most classes are currently in Finnish but the company is working hard to increase its English offerings.

Bringing gym sessions into the home means that people can more easily fit yoga classes into their lives while also saving money. Are there other kinds of teaching and advice that could be streamed into the home in this way?

Website: www.yoogaia.com
Contact: mikko.petaja@yoogaia.com